The Early Bird Gets The Worm…

Or in this case the better deal! I slashed ticket prices for our Beauty DIY class on May 19th, 2pm-4pm for a few weeks but the early bird tickets end TONIGHT!! After that the tickets will go back to regular price, so please save yourself 10 bucks and get your ticket NOW! There are only a few left as I limited the class size due to the interactive fun and so that I can give you personalized attention without being pulled in so many different directions 🙂 Looking forward to seeing you, DYIng, and making our faces shine like the stars we are, using items that are natural and safe for our bodies!! We don’t need to compromise our health for Beauty 💜

Link Below 🙂 You’re not going to want to miss this! 😉

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/natural-beauty-diy-tickets-45633526105?aff=es2

 

What You Need to Know About The Natural World

 

My family jokingly calls me “Bill Nye the Science Guy” for good reason- I can appreciate some good research and more importantly, scientific evidence that leads to RESULTS. I love results! I love working in my “lab” and making all sorts of natural goodness and therefore I go by Bill, Bill Nye. 😉

Today as I am doing some CEU’s (continuing education units) for my state licenses, I am doing one called, “Herbal Medication: An Evidence-Based Review.” (Don’t shut me off yet- this is important- I promise!). I want to knock out these units, but it was more important for me to stop and talk to you guys for a minute. So do me a favor and just read it, ok? 🙂

The article discusses some extremely important things you need to know if you live, or want to live, a natural, “crunchy”, “granola”-ish lifestyle. It talks about what makes one natural health product different from another.  (Keep reading!) Here is why this is important: If you don’t know the quality of your product, you have no real way of knowing what you are taking into your body and/or how it may effect you based on what is or isn’t in the product!

So what’s your point, Bobbie-jo? Well my point is, if you are living naturally to avoid toxicity, you can’t just pick up something from a health store shop and think it is good for you just because it is there. It CAN hurt you.

Here is what the article says:
“The concentration of active ingredients in HMs [Herbal Medications], however, is affected by numerous factors, including [9,24,25,26]:

The correct identification of the botanical source
The presence of contaminants or substitution of the intended source for other plants of lower cost with potential toxicologic consequences
Growing conditions, including temperature, geography and time of harvest, and possible contamination with micro-organisms, heavy metals, pesticides, or prescription drugs
Collection of the appropriate plant part (e.g., leaves versus root)
Preparation of specimens (e.g., drying, grinding)
Laboratory processing (e.g., solvent used for extraction of active ingredients)
Storage
Formulation of the final product (e.g., liquid versus solid pill)
These processes vary considerably among manufacturers and influence product quality and concentration of active ingredients in the final product.”

Do you see how serious this is?? Especially if Joe Smohe from Idaho is making your products in his mom’s basement – and he could be!!!

Allow me to summarize in bold font: IF YOU DON’T KNOW WHAT YOU’RE USING AND FROM WHOM YOU ARE USING IT, YOU ARE PLAYING WITH FIRE.

To quote again from the article, “Toxicity may also occur as the result of adulteration in the composition of HMs. This may occur by contamination with toxic plants or molds due to improper selection or storage. Toxicity may also occur as the result of adulteration in the composition of HMs [Herbal Medications]. This may occur by contamination with toxic plants or molds due to improper selection or storage. Adulterations of the intended product may occur either accidentally or deliberately when unscrupulous suppliers replace the intended plant for a cheaper one.” (Emphasis added by me).

To summarize: Manufacturers are coming out of the wood work right now to capitalize on this natural living “trend” (and for many it is a trend). Such manufacturers are interested in making money, not making you healthy. They are treating your life like pocket change.  It is proven that many suppliers are doing this, so what I say, I say with love. You better hope to God that your product was put together by scientists and doctors in a legitimate lab; scientists and doctors with medical degrees, pharmaceutical and physiological training and integrity, who keep all their practices and procedures out in the open for the public to be aware of. You better hope your company tests and retests their product and then sends it to multiple 3rd party testers to verify the purity of their product. Don’t take their word for it on a FB ad or fancy wording on the back of the bottle- go to the source.

Oh Bobbie-jo, isn’t that extreme? … Well, I don’t know; how much do you like your life?

If you think the FDA is doing this checking for you in the natural field, you’re wrong. If you think most of these companies out there are doing it for you, you’re wrong. When shady suppliers pop up, all sorts of toxicity has been found – lots of heavy metals, mold, synthetic products AND SYNTHETIC DRUGS have been found and proven (by real studies- not snoops.com hahahah).

What I say, I truly say with love and care for everyone. I want to help people live their best lives possible, to empower people and to speak the truth with love into people’s lives.

I have researched many different herbal/wellness/natural companies. There is only one I trust. I trust them so much that I modified my career for the time being so that I can help you all. I have made my business natural living so that I can show you a way to avoid, to the best of our ability, the pitfalls of this “microwave it and make it fast and cheap!” society we live in. And do I get paid to help? Absolutely. I have to!  Just like in the counseling office, or teachers in the classroom, or police officers out protecting people. We have to eat to live and our families need a roof over their heads. Just like you get paid to do your job. There is no shame in providing for your family through a service or product you wholeheartedly believe in. Please don’t run blindly into the natural world. A lot of companies are dimming their lights so that you can’t immediately see what they are doing.

 “These examples illustrate the need for an increased public and professional awareness, the implementation of appropriate quality control and exhaustive testing of supplies, adherence by the manufacturers to good manufacturing practices, and selection of products manufactured by reputable companies.” (Bold emphasis was added by me- the rest is from the article 🙂 )

 

Not sharing the truth when I can- to me would be like seeing someone getting hurt and not rushing over to help. Just wrong.

Below are the hundreds of resources used by the article I referenced 😉

 

RESOURCES
MedWatch: The FDA Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program
http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch
1-888-INFO-FDA
MedEffect Canada: Adverse Reaction and Medical Device Problem Reporting
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/dhp-mps/medeff/report-declaration/index-eng.php
1-866-234-2345
Natural Medicines Watch: Adverse Event Reporting Form
https://naturaldatabase.therapeuticresearch.com/nd/adverseevent.aspx
1-209-472-2244
Complete for Credit

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266. Mizuno S, Kato K, Ono Y, et al. Oral peppermint oil is a useful antispasmodic for double-contrast barium meal examination.J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2006;21(8):1297-1301.
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268. Ding M, Leach M, Bradley H. The effectiveness and safety of ginger for pregnancy-induced nausea and vomiting: a systematic review. Women Birth. 2013;26(1):e26-e30.
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272. Nair B. Final report on the safety assessment of Mentha piperita (peppermint) oil, Mentha piperita (peppermint) leaf extract, Mentha piperita (peppermint) leaf, and Mentha piperita (peppermint) leaf water. Int J Toxicol. 2001;20(suppl 3):61-73.
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275. Micklefield G, Jung O, Greving I, May B. Effects of intraduodenal application of peppermint oil (WS(R) 1340) and caraway oil (WS(R) 1520) on gastroduodenal motility in healthy volunteers. Phytother Res. 2003;17(2):135-140.
276. Goerg KJ, Spilker T. Effect of peppermint oil and caraway oil on gastrointestinal motility in healthy volunteers: a pharmacodynamic study using simultaneous determination of gastric and gall-bladder emptying and orocaecal transit time. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2003;17(3):445-451.
277. Chrubasik S, Pittler MH, Roufogalis BD. Zingiberis rhizoma: a comprehensive review on the ginger effect and efficacy profiles. Phytomedicine. 2005;12(9):684-701.
278. Kraft K. Erkrankungen der Haut (II). Diseases of the skin: other eczema types, acne and pruritus. Z Phytotherapie. 2007;28(3):129-133.
279. Grzanna R, Lindmark L, Frondoza CG. Ginger: an herbal medicinal product with broad anti-inflammatory actions. J Med Food. 2005;8(2):125-132.
280. Casterline Cl. Allergy to chamomile tea. JAMA. 1980;4:330-331.
281. Kraft K. Erkrankungen der Haut (II). Z Phytotherapie. 2007;28(4):178-180.
282. Aggag ME, Yousef RT. Study of antimicrobial activity of chamomile oil. Planta Med. 1972;22:140-144.
283. Awad R, Levac D, Cybulska P, Merali Z, Trudeau VL, Arnason JT. Effects of traditionally used anxiolytic botanicals on enzymes of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system. Can J Physiol Pharmacol. 2007;85(9):933-942.
284. Ross SM. An integrative approach to eczema (atopic dermatitis). Holist Nurs Pract. 2003;17:56-62.
285. Craker LE. Herb, Spices, and Medicinal Plants: Recent Advances in Botany, Horticulture, and Pharmacology. Vol 1. Phoenix, AZ: Oryx Press; 1986.
286. White B. Ginger: an overview. Am Fam Physician. 2007;75(11):1689-1691.
287. Carnat A, Carnat AP, Fraisse D, Ricoux L, Lamaison JL. The aromatic and polyphenolic composition of Roman camomile tea. Fitoterapia. 2004;75:32-38.
288. Mayo Clinic. Soy (Glycine max): Dosing. Available at http://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/soy/dosing/hrb-20060012. Last accessed June 15, 2016.
289. National Toxicology Program. NTP Brief on Soy Infant Formula, September 16, 2010. Available at http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/ntp/ohat/genistein-soy/soyformulaupdt/finalntpbriefsoyformula_9_20_2010.pdf. Last accessed June 9, 2016.
290. Krebs EE, Ensrud KE, MacDonald R, Wilt TJ. Phytoestrogens for treatment of menopausal symptoms: a systematic review. Obstet Gynecol. 2004;104(4):824-836.
291. Geller SE, Studee L. Botanical and dietary supplements for menopausal symptoms: what works, what does not. J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2005;14(7):634-649.
292. Lethaby AE, Brown J, Marjoribanks J, Kronenberg F, Roberts H, Eden J. Phytoestrogens for vasomotor menopausal symptoms. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2007;(4):CD001395.
293. Gerritsen M, Carley WW, Ranges GE, et al. Flavonoids inhibit cytokine-induced endothelial cell adhesion protein gene expression. Am J Pathol. 1995;147:278-292.
294. Sacks FM, Lichtenstein A, Van Horn L, Harris W, Kris-Etherton P, Winston M; American Heart Association Nutrition Committee. Soy protein, isoflavones, and cardiovascular health: an American Heart Association science advisory for professionals from the nutrition committee. Circulation. 2006;113(7):1034-1044.
295. Ma DF, Qin LQ, Wang PY, Katoh R. Soy isoflavone intake increases bone mineral density in the spine of menopausal women: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Clin Nutr. 2008;27(1):57-64.
296. Wong WW, Lewis RD, Steinberg FM, et al. Soy isoflavone supplementation and bone mineral density in menopausal women: a 2-y multicenter clinical trial. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;90(5):1433-1439.
297. Koukourakis GV, Kelekis N, Kouvaris J, Beli IK, Kouloulias VE. Therapeutics interventions with anti-inflammatory creams in post-radiation acute skin reactions: a systematic review of most important clinical trials. Recent Pat Inflamm Allergy Drug Discov. 2010;4(2):149-158.
298. Amsterdam JD, Shults J, Soeller I, Mao JJ, Rockwell K, Newberg AB. Chamomile (Matricaria recutita) may provide antidepressant activity in anxious, depressed humans: an exploratory study. Altern Ther Health Med. 2012;18(5):44-49.
299. Messina M, McCaskill-Stevens W, Lampe JW. Addressing the soy and breast cancer relationship: review, commentary, and workshop proceedings. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2006;98(18):1275-1284.
300. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. Herbs at a Glance: Soy. Available at https://nccih.nih.gov/health/soy/ataglance.htm. Last accessed June 17, 2016.
301. Anderson C, Lis-Balchin M, Kirk-Smith M. Evaluation of massage with essential oils on childhood atopic eczema. Phytother Res. 2000;14:452-456.
302. National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. Dietary Supplements. Available at https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/DietarySupplements-HealthProfessional/. Last accessed June 9, 2016.
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304. Tan MS, Yu JT, Tan CC, et al. Efficacy and adverse effects of ginkgo biloba for cognitive impairment and dementia: a systematic review and meta-analysis. J Alzheimers Dis. 2015;43(2):589-603.
305. Gui QF, Xu ZR, Xu KY, Yang YM. The efficacy of ginseng-related therapies in type 2 diabetes mellitus: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis. Medicine (Baltimore). 2016;95(6):e2584.
306. Guercio V, Galeone C, Turati F, La Vecchia C. Gastric cancer and allium vegetable intake: a critical review of the experimental and epidemiologic evidence. Nutr Cancer. 2014;66(5):757-773.
307. Raghu R, Lu KH, Sheen LY. Recent research progress on garlic (dà suàn) as a potential anticarcinogenic agent against major digestive cancers. J Tradit Complement Med. 2012;2(3):192-201.
308. Sarris J, Byrne GJ. A systematic review of insomnia and complementary medicine. Sleep Med Rev. 2011;15(2):99-106.
309. Gharib M, Samani LN, Panah ZE, Naseri M, Bahrani N, Kiani K. The effect of valeric on anxiety severity in women undergoing hysterosalpingography. Glob J Health Sci. 2015;7(3):358-363.
310. Borrelli F, Capasso R, Aviello G, Pittler MH, Izzo AA. Effectiveness and safety of ginger in the treatment of pregnancy-induced nausea and vomiting. Obstet Gynecol. 2005;105:849-856.
311. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Statement from Susan Mayne, Ph.D., on Proposal to Revoke Health Claim that Soy Protein Reduces Risk of Heart Disease. Available at https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm582744.htm. Last accessed November 2, 2017.
Evidence-Based Practice Recommendations Citations
1. American Psychiatric Association. Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Patients with Major Depressive Disorder. 3rd ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Association; 2010. Summary retrieved from National Guideline Clearinghouse at http://www.guideline.gov/content.aspx?id=24158. Last accessed June 22, 2016.
2. Greenlee H, Balneaves LG, Carlson LE, et al. Clinical practice guidelines on the use of integrative therapies as supportive care in patients treated for breast cancer. J Natl Cancer Inst Monographs. 2014;2014(50):346-358. Summary retrieved from National Guideline Clearinghouse at http://www.guideline.gov/content.aspx?id=49481. Last accessed June 22, 2016.
3. Snellman L, Adams W, Anderson G, et al. Diagnosis and Treatment of Respiratory Illness in Children and Adults. Bloomington, MN: Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement; 2013. Summary retrieved from National Guideline Clearinghouse at http://www.guidelines.gov/content.aspx?id=43792. Last accessed June 22, 2016.
4. Pittler MH, Ernst E. Kava extract for treating anxiety. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2003;(1):CD003383. Abstract available at http://www.cochrane.org/CD003383/DEPRESSN_kava-extract-for-treating-anxiety. Last accessed June 22, 2016.
5. Qaseem A, Fihn SD, Dallas P, et al. Management of stable ischemic heart disease: summary of a clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians/American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association/American Association for Thoracic Surgery/Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association/Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Ann Intern Med. 2012;157(10):735-743. Summary retrieved from National Guideline Clearinghouse at at http://www.guideline.gov/content.aspx?id=39254. Last accessed June 22, 2016.

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Never Wasted

I wish I had gotten a picture, but I was so captivated by the magnitude of the intricacies of life and the Creator of it all that I just watched.

This tiny little bird with blue jean colored feathers, alert black eyes and a crisp little fo-hawk landed about 3 feet away from me. At first it grabbed my attention because we don’t tend to have brave little visitors near our house due to our dog and cat, so a little birdy being so close was actually a rare sight to behold.

Then I noticed where the bird hand landed – on a pile of Hattie’s dog hair that I had groomed and brushed away in the busy fashion that is my life.

The bird landed, looked around- for safety precautions I imagine, and then began pecking at the soft hair tufts. As soon as he had what he could carry in his beak, he swiftly flew away, off to make its nest.

So what amazed me about this seemingly every day scenario? Well, I had a week. I mean, quite THE WEEK. Or maybe month. Months? Something like that 🙂 During this time, I have been reminding myself of Romans 8:28, that all things work to the good of those who love God and are called according to His purpose. I have been telling myself and my husband to get on our dancing shoes, because something GOOD is around the next corner- it has to be!

So when I saw that beautiful, tiny bird land and grab up some discarded treasure to use to build its castle in the sky, I was reminded with astounding clarity that God does not waste anything. He will take all the muck and the mess of our life – all of the, “how is this even happening?!” and “Oh, not again!!” moments and turn them into something good- beautiful even.  He won’t waste an opportunity to turn things around for you. Wouldn’t you do the same for your child? I know I would be chomping at the bit for the chance to go make things right, to help, to instill justice, to protect my children and to bless them beyond what they can even imagine.

So maybe even now, at this very time, God is picking up the tufts and saying, “We can use this.” Maybe it will be to build my castle in the sky, too. 😊💜

I don’t have all the answers. I never will. I will always have a pile of “why’s” on this earth. My heart yearns for kindness, for people to think of others and beyond themselves and what they want, sometimes my heart yearns for a break from all the trials and sadness and “why’s” here. But as C.S. Lewis said, we yearn for more because we were made for more.

….

Well, though I’m signing off from tonight’s ponderings, I’m sure the bird will come back – after all, we have the best hair fluff in town – all organic and totally DIY 🙂

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Rainy Monday Mama Thoughts

 

Over the past 5 or so years of being mostly home with the kids and working mostly from home, I took them all sorts of fun places: parks, beaches, picnics, bike riding, walks, to play with friends and more. Then Daddy and I also went on many vacations with the kid’s where the destinations when we arrived were always about what would be fun for the kids. In fact one hot summer, I spent an entire day at Dollywood Amusement Park, holding my youngest ALL DAY- it was a loooong, sweaty day of looking for the shady spots for me and the baby while daddy took our oldest on the kiddy rides (my youngest had a very hard time in loud, crowded places as a baby and would SCREAM unless I was holding him, so I held him for many years straight- until I found a natural alternative that helped him – now he is a social butterfly and non-stop talker! NON-STOP! lol 😊!)

So today, my oldest found a pressed coin from one of our trips to Amish Country that had a horse and buggy on it. I asked him if he remembered going on those rides, as it has been a year or 2 since we have been that way. I tell him about how when he was younger, he LOVED buggy rides and we would look for them wherever we traveled so that he could enjoy them… He doesn’t remember.

*Mom rant thoughts!* But, but, but…all that time! All that effort! All the money! The physical stress of holding my little one 24/7 in my arms so we could go and do all those things!

Now ask him if he remembers the time mommy threw out an old, broken toy that no one ever played with and the memory is as crisp as an Autumn apple! LOL!

I read a book several years ago by Dr. Kevin Leman, a psychologist, that basically says, tell me your first 3 childhood memories and I will tell you about your life.

You see, the memories WE hold onto and HOW we view those memories shapes how we see the world… And being a counselor mommy, I think about these things. And I am always wondering which memory we are creating that he will remember for the long term, though I know that every moment we have with our babies shapes them into the people they will become- whether they remember or not 💜

Just a few thoughts from my rainy Monday…

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Broken Trees Still Bloom?

I live in the country. Like… The country. Let’s just say that overalls are normal here (no, I don’t own any- I’ve always had a splash of Hollywood in my veins😊) and we may or may not have some people in our county that use old comodes (aka toilets for the northern folks!) in the front yard with their house number proudly displayed on it.

It always makes me smile and shake my head just slightly in bemusement when I drive by but hey, if you’re ever in a pinch… 😂

I love the country- in fact, I am currently on my porch swing enjoying the rain. That was one of the things my dad and I had in common- we both liked sitting on the porch and listening to the rain. 💜

I also love being in nature and I try to make it an everyday practice that the kids and I go for a walk around our family mountain for outdoor time and physical health.

Something that has really been sticking out to me this past month on our walks is how many of our trees are almost completely snapped in half due to the strong winds- and yet there are beautiful flowers blooming on the broken side- and ONLY THE BROKEN SIDE! Rather astonishing, I think.

After our walk today, I grabbed my phone and headed back down to get a pic of a tree that has been on my mind. When I got to it,  it began to pour down rain but I did the best I could in the few seconds I had 🙂

There’s a life lesson in this. A MAJOR one. Have you figured it out yet?

Think about it. A tree limb. Snapped in half. Hanging by a literal thread of wood. But there it is, blooming and producing beautiful flowers. Meanwhile on the other side, the unbroken side, there is just branch- no new growth, no flowers. Is anyone picking up on this? Get my drift?

No matter what image people try to portray, I can tell you as one who studies the mind (and lives in one!) That no one has their life perfectly together- and that’s good- and normal! Because if we did have everything ‘perfect’, there would be no growth. It is the adversity, the suffering, the literal snapping in half of our lives where we are left hanging on my a mere thread that the growth happens. Because it is in those moments that we can either fall over, play possom and call it a day, or we can use these challenges to make something new and wonderful, overcoming the odds and choosing life over despair- no matter how dire the situation. Wow. Those are some big words. Some tough words. I am almost cringing as they come to me to write down. Because what I’m writing, what I’m suggesting, is hard. Hard. Hard.

But it’s worth it; to throw in the towel on the things in our lives that we think are broken and don’t have a chance is to deny our God-given capabilites, strength and resilence. No, we can’t undo a shattered tree limb. But God can. And sometimes it may be His plan to fix your situation for you and make things comfortable again for you. And other times, most of the time I think, He see our brokenness. He sees our tears, our torn limb and the mess we find ourselves in. And instead of turning away and ignoring our pitiful state of need and despair, He comes along side us and helps us grow beautiful flowers. He helps us bloom in the midst of our pain – maybe even because of it. The Lord is near to the brokenhearted (the broken limbed) and if you are willing to let Him, He will help you turn that obstacle, that stressor, that suffering into something beautiful. Something that can not only help you and your branch, but also inspire all who walk by, seeing your glorious flowers and thinking, how did THAT happen? ….I thought she was just a broken limb.

💜 Bobbie-jo

 

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Is There Time to Pick a Flower in Heaven?

That’s what my youngest child thoughtfully asked me as he was riding in his car seat on the way home from church today. I told him, yes, I think there will be time to do that- to which he replied, “Ok, I am going to bring one to Jesus.”

What a precious thought of a 4 year old- to bring Jesus a gift- a flower. Imagine if for a minute our adult minds could slow down and think about bringing Jesus a flower. You know, when I put it that way, thinking of this is way more exciting than my to-do list constantly running in my head. (No wonder I give myself so many headaches!)

Not only do I have a constant “to-do” list in my mind of things I need to do for the family, the house, the careers, the wallet, the vehicles, friends etc., I also have a list of things “I need to do” to help everyone in the world. No wonder I am overwhelmed so much! Because last time I looked in the mirror, I did NOT suddenly discover I was Superwoman and though I may wear sandals, I am NOT Jesus. 😊

You know what I become when I try to be SuperWoman? Super Stressed, Super Tense, Super Tired and Super Migraine, to name a few. That’s *probably* proof that I’m not meant to do it all. And though it’s great to have goals, to want to help others and want to have a well-kept home, we simply can’t have it all in this world-  Not in a Debbie Downer way (don’t start flushing your dreams down the toilet!) – but in a ‘we have to pick and choose what’s most important to us’ way.

I went to a work conference yesterday and one of the speakers was right up my alley in terms of my personal 2018 goals – “Simplify.” She spoke about life being like a balance beam; you can only put so much on it before things start toppling off. So you have to choose. And for every “item” you put on your balance beam, that makes some thing else that cannot fit on your beam. I know for me that’s hard because this self-admitted NOT SuperWoman still has this silly belief in her head that she can do it all – or that she HAS to do it all (enter Super Migraine).

I hope today you can examine your balance beam and say “yes” to what’s most important to you and “no” – or simply “not yet” to the things that just won’t fit. I hope you save some wiggle room on your beam for time for baths and walks…. and thoughts about bringing Jesus flowers.

💜 Bobbie-jo

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What Do You Want Out of Life?

I absolutely love this; if you’re ever wondering what I’m thinking about at any given moment, it probably sounds something like this. I think existentially and laugh loudly. Every day I look at my life to make sure I am truly LIVING.
Are you?

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Do you like breathing?

Many of you know that my husband and I started down a new career path about 2 years ago. After becoming extremely sick with migraines when I was pregnant with my 2nd child, I started researching like crazy.  I wanted to figure out what was causing this response in my body and what could be done. The migraines would begin anytime I would smell a perfume, deodorant, laundry detergent, etc.

I had assumed my sensitivity would wane after having my son but it did not. I still get awful headaches from people walking by me or the stores with all their smells.

I became really passionate about helping others learn natural living when I studied what happens to your body as you wear, breathe and pile up these posions in your body (come on, did you think the supermarket was selling you something good for $1.97?)
Do you like your lungs? Your heart? Your brain cells? How about your blood stream? Do you enjoy breathing?
Just curious.

In April, I am starting a 30 day toxin detox program for those of you who want to see how good you really could feel. You may be quite surprised!

Please, please, please hear my heart. I didn’t stop providing full-time mental health therapy after 3 different college degrees just because I thought it would be fun to play in Shea Butter all day (even though that is fun 😊). I added a natural living career to my life because I want you to experience life to the fullest- to feel and function at your best- to enjoy life because you feel good!

Providing therapy lets me help people clean out the gunk inside so they can function healthily again. Providing natural living training lets me help people clean out the gunk on the outside so they can live their best life.

(*note* I cannot provide both for you- I can be your therapist OR your natural living coach but I cannot legally provide both- and I don’t want to!!! Lol!!! 💟)

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Well Bless Her Heart…

After 11 years living down South (12.5 if you count FL 😉), I  heard a new saying today and all I could think was “ain’t that the truth!” (Because I think Southern-Style in my head too …Except when I am really mad- suddenly I turn into a New Yorker again- really fast lol. 😳 😂)

Want to hear the saying? It was: “Have you ever listened to some folks for a minute and thought to yourself, ‘their corn bread ain’t done in the middle.'” For some reason after the past few months I’ve had, that struck me as pretty dang funny! 😊

I might just have to get that tattooed on my arm, amiright?! 😂 I’m thinking like a tattoo sleeve…. Some grits and cornbread – maybe some pinto beans wrapped around it, all fancy-like. 😂

Man if you don’t know me and you’re reading this right now, you have got to be thinking, what is wrong with this girl? Maybe HER cornbread isn’t done in the middle. So let me assure you, it’s done – I think I’m just a little crisp around the edges 😉

Life definitely has a way of causing us to feel a little cynical, sarcastic and sometimes just straight-up bitter, doesn’t it? I know I have my moments when I am just fed up! Get that cornbread away from me!!!

I am always reminded during rough days of the book/movie called Tuesday’s with Maurie. If you want an emotional, meaning of life movie, I defintely recommend it. In the movie, there is a moment where Maurie, a once fully self-sufficient college professor becomes so old and unable that he literally cannot move on his own. He is dying. And this “young buck” that he used to teach at college comes by to visit his favorite professor and he is SO angry about life and how could this be happening?!?! Maurie looks at him in a way that only people who have experienced life and THEN took time to examine their lives can, and he says, (paraphrasing) “Every day when I get up, I give myself 5 minutes to have all the pity I want. I whine, I grovel, I cry as I ask ‘Why me?’ But when those 5 minutes are passed, I say ‘Maurie, that’s self-pity and that’s enough of that. It’s time to move on and start your day.” And you see Maurie living life in a way-while even confined to his bed, a liquid diet, unable to use the bathroom on his own and knowing he is laying there to die-he is still constantly looking at the positive points of life- the good memories, the beautiful tree outside, the little things throughout the day….

Shew, what strength of mind that takes- to pick ourselves up by the bootstraps- everyday- whether we feel like it or not- whether the whole world is against us or not – and to move forward, only seeking out and focusing on the good in your life and not giving up. That skill is not something that just happens- Ooooh no. It is a day in, day out practice of shifting through your thoughts and pulling out the good ones and discarding the self-defeating ones…. That is something I am constantly working on and admire so very much in others… Persistance. Fortitude. Enjoying Life. Working hard. Looking for the good. Positive attitude. Never giving up. Going after their dreams regardless of the odds not being in their favor.

Last night I felt like throwing corn bread and burning those biscuits (another Southern saying) because life can be hard! Today I picked myself up by the bootstraps (or leggings, really) and reminded myself that no one can live my life for me. I can hold myself back or I can move forward. I can get bitter or I can get better. I can have a lifetime pity party about all the unfairness; I can complain about the hand I was dealt until the day I die OR I can move on and look for the next opportunity, the next blessing.

Guess which one I’m choosing?

How about you?

 

I Wish I May, I Wish I Might…

It is OK to take care of yourself! Take the time to invest in YOU- your health- both physically and mentally! So many people tell me, “Bobbie-jo, I really want to go natural because ______________ (fill in the blank) but I just don’t have the time to learn it all.”
Well, let’s address that.
1) When it comes to your wellness, THERE IS NO BETTER TIME THAN NOW. Period. End Sentence. 🙂
2) You don’t have to be a DIY Diva to empower yourself to a better life!
That’s what I’m here for! I will help you take one step at a time into the life you would rather live!
I am an educated Country/Hollywood type girl, so you know what that means? It means that I will help you peg down natural living in a way that is thoroughly researched, tried and true, easy to understand and a whole lotta fun! 😉
Do you want me to be your personal, down-to-earth and NORMAL wellness coach? Of course you do 😉 Send me a PM on my FB page! I have to divvy up my time so it will be first come first serve!

http://www.facebook.com/themasondixonDIYdiva

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I have a DIY for you- and some news!!

Everything feels better after a bath, am I right? Well let me tell you what I learned (well remembered) the hard way today…. Grapefruit Essential Oil: I love it for MANY things, but throwing a ton of drops in the tub, is NOT one of them! I feel a little “stingy” – I imagine this is how a jellyfish feels 24/7 lol

BUT let me share a fantastic soak with you- sans grapefruit! 🙂 Ok mixologists, are you ready? Grab equal parts Epsom salts, some pink Himalayan salts and a bit o’ baking soda. Add to it some Lavender and Lemongrass, maybe a little Sage if you’re feeling crazy 😉 Make sure this is a lid on this and shake it but don’t break it! (Creepy memory LOL: My dad used to go around the house and sing to my mom “Shake it but don’t break it; took your mama 9 months to make it…” Can we all just have a big EWW moment for the kid inside and then a sappy AWWW moment for how much they loved – and still love- each other? 🙂 ) ANYWAY- enjoy that Spring-scented soak!! Who is ready for Spring?? Me! (Minus the allergies but I am grateful that I FINALLY found something that gives them a big ol’ KO!)

So I have to tell you TWO more things!

  1. Roanokers- DIY class tomorrow!!! Send me a message for the deets!
  2. I started a DIY group on FB– for people who want to learn MORE DIY!!! Just click join! I do a Live DIY weekly and post recipes! I am putting the link below so you don’t miss out!!

https://www.facebook.com/groups/386765781783717/

 

  1. rose

Chocolate Isn’t Just For The Hips!

I wonder how chocolate became associated with pretty much every single holiday? Oh to be so popular that we were needed at every major event! LOL 🙂  I don’t have to ponder  very long why chocolate has made its way into practically every celebration: The stuff is Delicious! Dark, Milk, White, Semi-Sweet, and even straight up, unsweetened Cacao – I like it all! But my favorite, oh Lord help me, is Easter Candy… Cadbury, how could you?! There is nothing “good” for you in a Cadbury chocolate, but there is caramel, marshmallow, gooey Cadbury egg filling (what is that stuff anyway?)… oh my!

So even though I am now craving some thick, rich, chocolatey truffle, this DIY has NOTHING to do with eating chocolate! Nope. Zilch. Nada. Nothin’. So don’t worry- your hips are safe. Your lips, however, well that’s up to you!

If you want softer, smoother, lips for Valentine’s Day (or just because!), here is one for you, my friend!

Oh My Chocolate Lip Scrub!

Ingredients:

1.5 tsp Raw, Organic, Unrefined Coconut Oil, melted

1/4 tsp raw cacao powder

1 tsp organic sugar

1/4 tsp local honey

1/8 tsp non-GMO Vanilla Extract

1,5 tsp grated organic chocolate (optional)

Melt the coconut oil (ideally over a double boiler). Combine all ingredients. Put in container and store in a cool, dark place. This recipe will make about 1 ounce of product. Gently rub over your lips, using a circular motion. Rinse. Repeat process a few times per week. Don’t put scrub on open sores or cuts on lips.

chocolate

 

 

 

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